Rev. Peyton Sticks Out \

Rev. Peyton Sticks Out "Like A Sore Thumb" At Warped Tour

"People need to seek out labels like that are the good guys. Seek out bands that are making great music and don't be tricked into consuming terrible stuff the way you might consume a Pepsi or something, you know? Music is not a product. It's art. It is our soul. As humans it's important."

- Corinne
Photo by Todd Fox

posted July 22, 2010

How are you doing?

I'm doing fantastic.

So washboard isn't exactly a popular instrument on Warped Tour...

[laughs]

...blues isn't exactly popular on Warped Tour.

Yeah.

How are fans reacting to your band so far?

It's been great. We stick out like a sore thumb which I think helps us, to be honest. There are some bands out here that their fans are eleven year old girls. Sometimes I think some of those girls like we're from planet Mars. But for the vast majority of Warped Tour fans it's being going over huge. It's been awesome.

What made you want to sign up for Warped Tour?

We did two weeks of it last year. And I think it was just sort of like, "hey, let's see how this'll work." It was so much fun. When they asked us to do the whole thing this summer we jumped at it.

The songs on your new album, "The Wages," focus on Every Man type of problems, working class values. It's not politically left or right specifically. Do you have one or several political messages you wanted to get across with the album?

To me, I guess, it's like, I think politics is suckers' game. I think social-tics. [laughs] You know, social problems are what's important. What matters is people being hungry, people not able to work. To me that's what's really important. I think that sometimes people are so caught up in, I guess, what side they're on that they forget what really matters. And the fact that there's only two sides to choose in this country is pretty messed up anyway. You find yourself, and I don't know if I'm the only one, I find myself going, "well that makes sense but so does this." Still nothing gets done. I know a lot of people in this country go back and forth the way they vote based on how someone looks or talks or whatever. To me, I think the most important thing is to really just pay attention to what's happening and figure out what we can do ourselves to make it right because big corporations, the government they're not coming to save us. We're on our own.

This is your first album with a new drummer [Aaron "Cuz" Persinger]. How different of a change was that?

You know what, it wasn't that different of a change, to be honest with you. He fit right in and has been doing great. It really didn't chance too much. I guess maybe it was easier than I thought it was gonna be or...it was different but now it sort of feels like almost the same as it did before.

I guess it's like this, I was really nervous about it when this was all going down and my brother didn't want to be on the road anymore. I didn't know how things were gonna go. Things worked out, everyone's happy now and where they belong. So when that happens it's hard to complain about anything.

That's a very positive way to look at things.

[laughs]

It is a really family affair with your band. Is that important to you?

Yeah, I guess some bands go, "man, you tour with your wife [Washboard Breezy Peyton]." But I can't imagine not doing it. I think it'd be lonesome. I feel real lucky to do what I do the way I do it.

The album was on Billboard's blues chart. What do you think of blues coming out now versus old school stuff?

I think that blues - and a lot of different genres of music, not to pick on blues - I think we're being force fed stuff that's terrible. I think we as a people need to stand up and say, "listen, there's so much great music out there, the record labels, the media, whatever, they're not bringing us the good stuff." A lot of the good stuff is pushed aside and we need to be more proactive to go out there and find what's good and support it.

I feel lucky to be associated with SideOneDummy cause I think the stuff they put out is all really good. I think we're in a position where we fit in pretty good on the label and I'm proud to be apart. People need to seek out labels like that are the good guys. Seek out bands that are making great music and don't be tricked into consuming terrible stuff the way you might consume a Pepsi or something, you know? Music is not a product. It's art. It is our soul. As humans it's important.